The Place of Our Resurrection

http://www.tenwomengallery.com/index.php/montana-ave-store/70-karyn-raz
Art by: Karyn Raz

 

As you know (if you’ve been following my blog) I’ve been reading David Adam’s work,  A Desert in the Ocean. This little book is dense with Spirit inspiration.

Today, I was struck by the third-century Celtic perspective about resurrection. They didn’t focus on a post-death experience. Instead, from their perspective, the place of their resurrection was when they found their life’s purpose and entered into it.

It is an affirmation of my belief that we are called to the place where our greatest passions meet the world’s greatest needs. In that crossroads lies our vocation, our joy, and according to the Celts, our resurrection.

 

 

 

 

The Place of My Resurrection

Holy Awen
breathe me
to the place of my resurrection.

Hang me in the crossroads
a gangly, grinning scarecrow
to draw the volt of raptors
whose dirty talons
claw
infecting healthy souls

with fear
of failure
of sorrow
of pain
of poverty
of sickness
of death.

Let the disease-ridden wake
land on me
for I’ve faced this flock
and their beaks have lost their pluck.

Let them land
for they will not feast
upon the chortling mad woman
hanging on her cross.

Current Canon for a Contemporary World

adam“For life to be lived to the full it has to be adventurous. I believe that God calls us to adventure.”

So begins David Adam’s book A Desert in the Ocean – God’s Call to Adventurous Living. *  It heads my list of new canon, because virtually every sentence impacts me, makes me want to run out my front door – to act and to be.

Adam posits that adventure does not take us out of the world, but more deeply into it, and not just into the physical world, but into the spiritual as well. For the Celtic view is that there are not two separate worlds – the mystic & the mundane – instead, heaven and earth are inextricably interwoven, so that exploring one leads us naturally into the other.

Adam states “A slight shift in where we stand and the world beyond reveals itself to us.” I’ve found that to be true. I have seen ‘the other side’ – usually only glimpses, but sometimes a clear, if fleeting, view. I can’t describe it, of course, not directly, because human language is inadequate. It’s not about the input of eyes, ears, nose or hands. It’s about what the heart sees. What the soul sees. What that part of us that extrudes beyond the mere physical experiences and explores.

I find myself speaking in metaphor or in parable, trying to describe what I’ve seen. Jesus did the same. Now I understand that he wasn’t trying to be abstruse. He was doing his best to communicate as clearly as he could. Where direct description finds itself mute, poetry and other lyrical language may successfully speak.

Adam’s book is a call to action. It even includes exercises at the end of each chapter to help us to open ourselves to God’s call to life adventurous. It exhorts, it inspires, it pushes us in the direction of the divine. The loopy script of Spirit clearly flows from Adam’s pen. Just like all Scripture, it is inspired and inspiring, current canon for a contemporary world.

* Its American tagline reads: The Spiritual Journey according to Brendan the Navigator. I got my copy at Iona Island in Scotland.

Holy Wanderer – the canon of the Journey

_DSC5832“I’ve been on many journeys.” – Paul of Tarsus, writing to the church at Corinth in autumn 55 CE.

I don’t know how many times I’ve begun my altar time with deep prayer and/or a card reading, then opened my daily reading book (currently Celtic Daily Prayer) to find that the scripture reading affirms and further enlightens the initial whisper of Spirit. It happened again today.

First, I meditated on two cards drawn from Wisdom of the Crone: Magick and Journey. They instructed me that my ‘glimpses’ are true visions of the Divine, and that my life path will include exciting journeys. They further noted me that ‘home’ is within me as I travel grounded in Spirit.

Then I turned to Celtic Daily Prayer and discovered that today’s readings centered around journey: specifically, the physical journeys that lead us to spiritual awakening.

I’ve always considered myself Peregrini – a spiritual wanderer. My life choices haven’t given me opportunity to indulge in much physical wandering, but Spirit assures me this is coming, and soon. So it’s no surprise that as I gathered books from my shelf inspire me, many revolve around travel. They include:

The Sacred Journey, The Art of Pilgrimage, A Desert in the Ocean, The Book of Creation, The Cloister Walk._DSC5830

I’ll talk about each of these books in subsequent posts, making the case for their inclusion in canon.  Then I’ll give you my fiction list. (Fiction? Divinely inspired story telling? Yep. Just like many of the stories in the Bible and other holy writ.)

If you’re feeling the tug of Spirit, read these books. Walk the path of the Peregrini with me.